Blog

51 Insanely Good Hungarian Foods You Should Know About

51 Insanely Good Hungarian Foods You Should Know About

Traditional Hungarian food is a kaleidoscope of rich flavours, textures, smells and colours. To help you get started on your culinary conquest of Hungarian cuisine. We’ve collected 51 tasty Hungarian foods you have to try and some tips on where you should go to eat them in Budapest. Plus some simple recipes you can follow to bring a bit of Hungarian flavour inside your own home. 


1. Kifli (Crescent bread)

Crescent breads

Kifli is a staple Hungarian breakfast pastry made of yeasted dough. It’s usually eaten as a sandwich filled with smoked sausage or ham. Or you can enjoy it with some butter and a cup of warm cocoa.

Where to eat in Budapest: Kiskovász Kézműves Pékség | Kifli és Kocsma  

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


2. Felvágott (Cold cuts plate)

Cold cuts plate

A classic Hungarian cold cuts plate is a carnivore’s dream with a selection of delicious smoked or dried sausage, salami, ham, and Hungarian style mortadella. A traditional felvágott uses pork meat, paired with white bread, cheese and some seasonal veggies.

Where to eat in Budapest: Felvágott can be found in most restaurants, butchers and supermarkets in Budapest.

Make Your Own: Main Recipe


3. Töpörtyű (Fried Pork Rind)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Csákvári Kata (@birkacsarda_kata) on

Deep-fried pork rind is a staple Hungarian food that’s eaten at snack for breakfast or between meals—usually paired with red onions and a slice of fresh white bread—washed down with a nice shot of fruity palinka or beer to cut through the saltiness. Although pork Töpörtyű is the most popular, duck or goose skin varieties are also available.

Where to eat in Budapest: Hentes Falatozója | Töpörtyű can also be found in most convenience stores and supermarkets in Budapest.

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2 


4. Körözött (Liptauer)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by ✖️gastro•photography✖️ (@gastropht) on

Körözött is a traditional cheese spread that Hungarians love to eat on bread. Back in the day, the main ingredient used to make this condiment was goats cheese. Todays Körözött also has cottage cheese, sour cream, carroway seeds, butter, paprika and salt added to the mix. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Cserpes Tejivó | You’ll also find Körözött at most grocery stores and supermarkets in Budapest.

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


5. Bundás kenyér (French toast)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by @orlovacz.beatrix on

Bundás kenyér is the Hungarian version of french toast. The only difference is that it’s savoury, slightly crispy and traditionally served with sour cream or finely grated cheese. It’s generally eaten for breakfast but is also an excellent option to fuel up for the afternoon. 

Where to eat in Budapest: KekszBörze Étterem

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


6. Halászlé (Fisherman’s soup)

Fisherman's soup

Halászlé is a flavourful, hearty and lightly spiced soup made using fresh river-fish. The dish was initially eaten by local fisherman, who’d cook the soup in big iron cauldrons (Bogrács) by the Danube. Today, it’s eaten throughout the year, especially on Christmas eve.

Where to eat in Budapest: Szegedi csárda | Halkakas halbisztró

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


7. Húsleves (Beef Consommé)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Annuskám (@wannuskam) on

Húsleves is a staple Hungarian food that’s eaten as a starter or light main course. The dish has a clear, fragrant broth made with beef, root vegetables and angel hair pasta. According to Hungarian grandmas, it can cure all diseases and ailments. 

Where to eat in Budapest: 21 Magyar vendéglő | Náncsi néni vendéglője

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2 


8. Jókai bableves (Bean soup)

A soup

Jókai bableves is a hearty soup made with beans, smoked ham, sausage and root vegetables. The perfect dish to eat as a starter or main course, accompanied by sour cream and a slice of bread. The soups name is inspired by Hungarian writer Mór Jókai, who apparently ordered it daily at a restaurant near Lake Balaton.  

Where to eat in Budapest: Regős Vendéglő | Gulyáskantin

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


9. Gulyás (Goulash)

white plate filled with beef gulyás and potato dumplings in a budapest restaurant

Gulyás  (Pronounced Goo-Yash) is a hearty stew that’s a globally recognised symbol of Hungarian food culture. A traditional gulyas is made with beef, carrots, potatoes and paprika. It’s a hearty dish that can be eaten as a starter or main course. Excellent on its own or with some egg noodle dumplings and a slice of fresh bread.

Where to eat in Budapest: Gettó Gulyás | Stand25 | BestiaRosenstein Vendéglő

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


10. Hideg Meggyleves (Cold Sour-Cherry Soup)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by LX Cooks (@lxcooks_recipes) on

 

Hideg Meggyleves is a sour-cherry cold soup that’s super popular amongst Hungarians in the summer. The fruitiness of the cherries and richness of the sour cream is a killer combo. It sounds strange but is an extremely traditional Hungarian food that’s eaten all year round—especially refreshing on a hot summers day in Hungary. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Leves | Bors GasztroBar

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


11. Csirke paprikás (Chicken paprikash)

A traditional Hungarian dish.

Chicken Paprikash is another Hungarian food recognised around the world. This super hearty stew consists of big pieces of chicken in a creamy paprika sauce. The consistency of the stew is not as thick as Gulyás but can be made more viscous by adding sour cream and flour. It’s traditionally eaten as a main course for lunch or dinner. Either on its own or with some bread and egg dumplings (Nokedli).

Where to eat in Budapest: Hilda | Émile | Zeller Bistro 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


12. Töltött Káposzta (Stuffed cabbage)

Hungarian stuffed cabbages

Töltött káposzta is a classic Hungarian food for the holiday season and family celebrations. It’s usually made with cabbage (sauerkraut) leaves stuffed with a mixture of rice, meat (pork & beef) and ground paprika. Eating this during the winter, pig slaughter season is said to bring you good fortune. So get ready to stuff yourself.

Where to eat in Budapest: Pozsonyi Kisvendéglő | Nagy fatal konyhaja | Stand

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


13. Rántott hús (Schnitzel)

A main course

Rántott hús is made with tender pieces of meat inside a crispy breadcrumb coating. The meat is traditionally veal, but chicken and pork are often used instead. It’s served in houses across the country on Sundays and usually eaten with some rice or bread. Easy to make, hard to resist.

Where to eat in Budapest: A Séf utcája | Cafe KorVendéglő a KisBíróhoz

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


14. Kocsonya (Meat Jelly/Aspic)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kata Dimény (@cook.walk.love) on

Every cuisine has a dish that divides opinions. In Hungary, Kocsonya is that dish that you either adore or despise. It’s mostly a meat jelly made with pig snouts, trotters ears and all unwanted parts. A portion of real old-school food that Hungarians will remember from childhood dinners at grans. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Mezzo

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


15. Pörkölt (Hungarian Stew)

Two plates with food
Like Gulyás and Chicken Paprikash, Pörkölt is a staple stew that’s synonymous with Hungarian food culture. The significant difference is that Pörkölt is made with boneless meat and has a thicker consistency than the other two. Beef Pörkölt is the most popular, but pork, chicken and tripe versions are also quite common. Pörkölt is excellent on its own or with some egg barely (tarhonya), bread and pickles.

Where to eat in Budapest: Gettó Gulyás | Náncsi néni vendéglője | Kicsi Csángó

Make Your Own:  Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


16. Sólet (Cholent)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Raheli Krut | Krutit (@raheli) on

 

 Sólet is the Hungarian adaptation of Cholent. A tasty Jewish dish traditionally slow-cooked on a Friday before Sabbath, then eaten the following day. Hungarian Sólet consists of white beans with smoked meats, eggs, paprika and onions. Extremely hearty, nutritious and fulfilling.

Where to eat in Budapest: Fülemüle Étterem | Rosenstein Vendéglő | Macesz bistro

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


17. Főzelék (Vegetable stew)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Dorka 🤰🏼 (@dorkaland) on

Főzelék is a traditional vegetarian pottage usually eaten as a main course at lunch. Its texture is somewhere between soup and stew. With vegetables left to simmer into a soup that’s lightly thickened by adding flour and finished off with sour cream. Pea, potato, cabbage, squash and lentil varieties are the most popular.

Where to eat in Budapest: Hokedli | Cafe Kor

Make Your Own: Zöldborsó Főzelék (Pea) | Spenót Főzelék (Spinach) | More Recipes


18. Töltött paprika (Stuffed paprika)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Marton Toth (@tothmarci8) on

 

This dish consists of Hungarian yellow wax pepper stuffed with rice and meat, on a bed of tangy tomato sauce. A real school canteen classic that’s eaten with a boiled potato. Like the stuffed cabbage, Töltött paprika came to Hungary during the Ottoman invasions of the 16th century. The Ottoman’s have gone, but this dish still remains and has become. a much loved Hungarian food.

Where to eat in Budapest: Lecsó | Biarritz Restaurant

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


19. Túrós csusza (Pasta with cottage cheese)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Farkasné Csapó Ildikó (@csildigram) on

Túrós csusza is a classic Hungarian pasta made with cottage cheese, sour cream and crispy bacon. It’s a hot and cold dish, with a dollop of cold cottage cheese added on top of the main warm pasta tray. Túrós csusza is a very versatile dish that can be eaten as a side with dinner, but also as a main course or dessert. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Újpesti Kakukk VendéglőNáncsi Néni vendéglője

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


20. Káposztás tészta (Cabbage Pasta)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Dévai-Fónai Viktória 🌻☀️ (@vikikekonyha_) on

 

Káposztás tészta is a traditional Hungarian food that was initially eaten by the peasant class. The main ingredients for this dish include a square pasta mixed with shredded cabbage that’s sauteed in lard. Completed with a generous sprinkling of salt, pepper or confectioners sugar. It’s usually eaten as a side dish with duck and even as a main course.

Where to eat in Budapest: Fenyő Gyöngye  

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


21. Rakott krumpli (Hungarian Layered potatoes)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Babramegy blog (@babramegy) on

Rakott krumpli is a heart-warming dish traditionally made with sliced sausage, boiled egg, sour cream and layered potatoes. It’s usually eaten as a main course and brings back childhood memories of family dinners for most Magyars. A real feel-good Hungarian food that’s simple to make tastes great on its own or with a slice of white bread.

Where to eat in Budapest: Stand 25

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


22. Nokedli (Egg Dumplings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Tomi’s Kitchen (@tomiskitchen1) on

 

Nokedli is a pasta-like Hungarian dumpling made from an egg flour dough. Unlike pasta, nokedli isn’t shaped, with the doughy mixture being grated directly into boiling water. It’s a real staple food that both eaten on its own or paired with a rich Hungarian stew.

Where to eat in Budapest: Hungarikum Bistro | Paprika Vendéglő

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


23. Libamáj (Foie gras)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Csorba Péter (@csorbap) on

Foie gras is a standard fixture on fine dining menus across the world. It’s a rich and creamy food made from fattened goose liver. Most people associate it with the french, yet Hungary happens to be the second-largest exporter of the stuff. Known in Hungarian as Libamáj, it’s traditionally served with fruity jams and paired with sweet Tokaji aszú wine. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Vadrózsa Étterem | La Perle Noire 

Make Your Own: Try these recipes


24. Bácskai rizseshús (Pork stew with rice)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by 🐾Anita Pataki 🐾👩‍🍳🐶❤️ (@annie_pataki) on

Bácskai rizseshús is a meat stew (porkolt) and rice dish, traditionally made with pork. Incredibly delicious, satisfying and popular amongst both the older and younger generations. Best when served with a side of gherkins. You can also use chicken instead of pork if you like. 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


25. Tojásos nokedli (Hungarian dumplings with eggs)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Csaba Fazekas (@fazekascsaba2) on

Nokedli is usually a side dish to accompany Hungarian stews, like Gulyás or pörkölt. Yet if you’re looking to keep things simple, then Tojásos nokedli is the ideal way to eat it. In this recipe, egg dumpling and scrambled eggs mix to make a mouth-watering mele of flavours. Simple to make and traditionally served with a pickled salad.

Where to eat in Budapest: KIOSKNokedli Bár 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


26. Grízes tészta (Noodles with semolina)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Júlia Kollár (@lifeofjulcsi) on

 

Grízes tészta is a sweet pasta dish made with toasted semolina topped up with a dollop of apricot jam. A prime example of the Magyars innovative approach to pasta. This Hungarian food is traditionally eaten as a main course after some soup. 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


27. Paprikás krumpli (Potato paprikash)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kárai Dávid (@karaidavid) on

Paprikás krumpli is a cheap and straightforward stew, that super tasty and filling. The main ingredients are potato and paprika, with sausage and bacon commonly added to beef up the dish. Today it’s eaten daily in households and canteens across the country. Yet it was initially a stape of shepherds in rural Hungary. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Fióka 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


28. Vadas Marha (Hunters Style Beef stew)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by JuditTiti_ (@_jucus_87) on

 

Vadas is a slow-cooked stew traditionally made using game meat with root vegetables. However, beef is a popular alternative to game meat today. The stew has a distinct brown colour and complex flavour profile. With caramel bringing some sweetness that’s balanced out by the sourness of mustard sauce and lemon juice. A super-rich and fulfilling dish best served with some bread dumplings. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Mezzo | Gettó Gulyás | Korhely “faloda és daloda”

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2 


29. Lángos (fried dough)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by life is pain… au chocolat (@miso.en.place) on

Langos is a deep-fried dough that’s traditionally brushed with minced garlic, topped with sour cream and grated cheese. Today, you can add whatever topping you like, with Nutella being a popular variant. It’s Hungarian street food staple that features on every visiting foodie’s bucket list. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Krumplis Lángos | Drum Cafe

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


30. Lecsó ( Hungarian Ratatouille)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Veronika Sajner (@kicsikitchen) on

Lecsó is a ratatouille style vegetable stew made with Hungarian wax pepper, onions and tomatoes. It’s a real staple dish that’s traditionally eaten for lunch, especially in the summer. Incredibly delicious on its own, but also goes well with meat and a side of egg barley, rice or bread.

Where to eat in Budapest: Hadik | Séf utcája | Bárkert Bistro | Törökméz

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


31. Kolbász (Smoked & Dried Sausage)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Anikó (@paprikameetskardamom) on

Kolbász is a Hungarian style sausage made from a mixture of spices, ground meat and fat, stuffed inside pig intestines. There are so many different styles of Kolbász, each with subtle differences in the prep and ingredients used. Debreceni, Csabai and Gyulai are probably the most popular. Kolbász is commonly used to add a bit of body to traditional stews. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Cintányéros | Töltő | Pinczi hús-hentesáru 

Make Your Own: Full Recipe & Prep


32. Hurka (Roasted Sausage)

Sausage with salad.

Hurka is another classic Hungarian style sausage that’s eaten at all times of the day. Unlike Kolbász, this sausage is made with a ground pork meat paste mixed with rice and a mild spice blend. The meat used inside the sausage is a mixture of lungs, liver and other innards. The sausage is roasted and traditionally eaten with some bread and pickles. 

Where to eat in Budapest: A Séf utcája | Belvárosi Disznótoros | Like Kolbász, Hurka can be purchased at most supermarkets and butchers in Budapest.

Find Out More


33. Uborka saláta (Hungarian cucumber salad)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Zsuzsanna Deer (@zsuzsannadeer) on

Uborka saláta is a traditional Hungarian salad made with fresh cucumber, salt, vinegar, water and sugar. Paprika and sour cream are also commonly added to enhance the flavours. It’s simple and goes perfect with breaded meat or a hearty stew. You can find it in pretty much every traditional Hungarian restaurant in Budapest.

Where to eat in Budapest: Kívánság kifőzde | Hungarikum Bistro 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


 

34. Zsíros kenyér (Bread with grease)

Bread and a glass of drink

Zsíros kenyér is essentially a slice of white bread, covered with grease, topped off with some red onions and paprika. In line with tradition, a classic Zsíros kenyér is made with pig fat, but goose fat can also be used. It’s a straightforward yet flavourful and fulfilling Hungarian food that goes well with a glass of wine or palinka.

Where to eat in Budapest: Tokaji Borozó 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1


 

35. Tatár beefsteak (Tartare)

Tatár

If the idea of eating raw meat makes your stomach churn, then look away. Yet if you’re a fan, then the Hungarian style beef Tatár will hit the spot. The only real difference is the addition of Hungarian yellow wax pepper, served with a runny yolked egg. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Csalogány 26

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Recipe 1 – Video Version


36. Pogácsa (Scones)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Dorottya Sárai (@sdorottya) on

 

Pogácsa is a bite-sized savoury pastry eaten by Hungarians on all occasions. It’s somewhere in between a scone or biscuit, with multiple varieties and styles available. Cheese Pogácsa is the most popular, but potato, cottage cheese and plain types are also common. You can buy them in most bakeries and supermarkets across Budapest. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Pékesség | Ruszwurm | Daubner

Make Your Own: Cheese Pogácsa | See More Recipes


37. Kakaós Csiga (Cocoa Snail)

A sweet chocolate bun pastry.

Kakaós Csiga is one of the most popular sweet baked goods in Hungary. With around 90 million of them consumed annually. You can judge how good a bakery is by the cocoa snail they serve. Traditionally, they are supposed to be crispy and moist on the outside. Soft, chocolaty and sweet in the middle. A simple but delicious snack that’s perfect for all times of the day. 

Where to eat in Budapest: ArtizanPekmuhely | Butter Brothers | Jacques Liszt

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1  | Recipe 1 – Video Version


38. Palacsinta (Crêpes)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Annuskám (@wannuskam) on

Although not originally Hungarian, crêpes are extremely popular and usually served after the main course at lunch or dinner. Palacsinta is super thin, traditionally rolled up and filled with jam, Nutella, poppy seeds or cinnamon-sugar.

Where to eat in Budapest: Bank3 | Bajnok Palacsinta Egyesület | Cziko’s Palacsinta 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | See More Recipes


39. Gesztenyepüré (Chestnut puree)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by osvartjuci (@osvartjuci) on

 

Gesztenyepüré is a much loved sweet treat made with pureed chestnut, rum and copious amounts of whipped cream. This scrumptious dessert is creamy, but not too sweet. Although a prevalent Hungarian food, the origins of the dish can be traced back to Italy.

Where to eat in Budapest: Rosenstein

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


40. Kürtöskalács (Chimney cake)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kálci (@kalcirecept) on

Kürtöskalács is one of the most famous Hungarian food made using a sweet yeast dough. The dough is wrapped around a baking spit and cooked over some hot charcoal. It’s traditionally eaten with a coating of cinnamon and granulated sugar. Today there are plenty more adventurous toppings available. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Molnár’s Kürtöskalács | Édes Mackó | Most Underground stations also have stalls selling chimney cakes.

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


41. Arany Galuska (Golden Dumplings)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Dömény Diána (@dianadomeny) on

Aranygaluska is a Hungarian Jewish dessert traditionally baked for the religious holiday of Purim. The desert consists of yeast dough balls dipped in melted butter before getting a nice coating of sugar and walnuts. Perfect on there own, or pair with some custard for an authentic local experience. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Felix Kitchen & Bar

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


42. Dobos torta (Dobos cake)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Erzsébet Kézi (@22kezi) on

 

Dobostorta is an iconic Hungarian layered sponge cake created by József C. Dobos. A confectioner by trade, this sweet treat was the result of his experiment to create a cake that lasts. It has six layers of sponge with a nice spread of chocolate buttercream in between each layer. It’s finished off with a glistening layer of hard caramel and a sprinkling of nuts on top. A sweet, tooths wet dream.

Where to eat in Budapest: Zila | Nándori CukrászdaKoch-Danica Cukrászda

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


43. Rétes (Strudel)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Botos Reni (@reni_botos) on

Known in English as a strudel, Rétes is a real sweet treat that consists of thinly layered pastry, traditionally filled with apple, cherry, or fresh cottage cheese. It first came about when the Magyars were under Habsburg rule. Although time has passed since its introduction, it’s still one of the popular desserts in Hungary. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Rétesbolt Anno 1926 | Házi rétesbolt | Strudel Hugó

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


44. Bejgli (Walnut or poppy seed roll)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Felicity Spector (@felicityspector) on

 

Bejgli is delicious ground poppy seed or walnut filled sweet pastry that no Magyar Christmas feast would be complete without. In Hungary, it’s common practice to remove sugar from the filling and replace it with some delicious apricot jam.

Where to eat in Budapest: Nándori cukrászda | Daubner | Auguszt Cukrászda

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


45. Madártej (Hungarian floating islands)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Kárai Dávid (@karaidavid) on

Madártej is one of the most popular desserts in Hungary. Originally from France, the dessert consists of a smooth sweet soup known as birds milk. Which has some mouth-watering velvety meringue islands floating on top. The dessert is eaten cold after a big feast, or on its own for lunch.

Where to eat in Budapest: Rosentestein | Komedias Café | Olimpia étterem

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


46. Túró Rudi (Curd snack)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Pöttyös Túró Rudi (@pottyos_turo_rudi) on

Túró Rudi is a chocolate-coated cottage cheese bar that’s become the national symbol for Hungarian confectionery. With the iconic red polka dot packs visible on the shelves of every convenience store and supermarket in the country. The perfect sweet snack. 

Where to get it in Budapest: Available in all convenience stores and supermarkets

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


47. Somló Galuska ( Somló dumplings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Marica Dudics (@dudics_marica) on

 

Somló Galuska is an award-winning Hungarian confectionery that’s been a staple for sweet tooths since the 1950s. This classic dessert has a soft sponge cake, custard cream and rum-soaked raisins. With a generous helping of heavy cream and chocolate sauce. The sweet treat was the brainchild of Károly Gollerits, the former head waiter at Budapest’s iconic Gundel restaurant.

Where to eat in Budapest: OnyxGerbeaudKárolyi Étterem

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 |  Try Recipe 2


48. Kókuszgolyó (Chocolate coconut balls)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Smuczer Hanna | Food + Photo (@smuczer.hanna) on

Kókuszgolyó is a truffle-like Hungarian confectionery traditionally eaten at Christmas or Easter. All-Purpose crackers (Háztartási keksz) form it’s base, with a few other ingredients used to turn it into a paste-like cookie dough. The dough is then moulded into small balls before being rolled in coconut flakes. They’re simple to make and taste amazing.

Where to eat in Budapest: Ruszwurm

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


49. Szilvás gombóc (Plum dumplings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Krisztina Béres (@bereskrisztina) on

 

Szilvás gombóc are potato dumplings filled with a sweet plum jam centre. These are boiled in hot water, rolled into breadcrumbs and finished off with Cinnamon-sugar on top. This traditional dessert is popular from late summer to fall when Hungary’s plum season is in full swing. 

Where to eat in Budapest: GomBRO’c

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


50. Mákos Guba (Poppyseed bread)

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Oláh Szofi | Lowcarb & Keto (@egyelcsakcsillagom) on

Mákos Guba is a delicious pudding made with layers of white bread soaked in a creamy poppy seed sauce. Some people bake it till crispy; others serve it cold with vanilla custard. Whatever the pairing, this Hungarian classic always hits the spot. Although now enjoyed all year round, Mákos Guba is a traditional Christmas sweet treat. 

Where to eat in Budapest: Mákos Guba Bistro | Bistro Fine 

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1Try Recipe 2


51. Túrógombóc (Cottage cheese dumplings)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A post shared by Dorka 🤰🏼 (@dorkaland) on

 

Túrógombóc is a traditional Hungarian dumpling made from Túró cheese (cottage), eggs, semolina and vanilla powder. The cheese dumplings have a subtle sweetness, so although a favourite dessert, they are also eaten as a main course.

Where to eat in Budapest: Börze | Stand25 Bisztro

Make Your Own: Try Recipe 1 | Try Recipe 2


The aim of this article was to give you a taster of the best in Hungarian food culture. Let us know if we’ve missed any foods or if you’d like to add any recommendations. In the meanwhile, check out some of our other content about mouth-watering Magyar food and drinks.

12 Savoury Hungarian dishes and where to try them in Budapest.

Palinka – A Guide to Hungary’s National Drink

24 Epic Places to Eat in Budapest

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: